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Prof.dr. Naomi Ellemers

Distinguished university professor

Research themes and publications

General

  • Ellemers, N. (2012). The group self. Science, 336, 848-852.
  • Ellemers, N., Spears, R., & Doosje, B. (1999). Social identity: Context, commitment, content. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
  • Haslam, A., Van Knippenberg, D., Platow, M., & Ellemers, N. (Eds.) (2003). Social identity at work: Developing theory for organizational practice. Psychology Press.


Self-regulation in groups

Dissertations

  • Faddegon, K. (2009). Regulatory focus in group contexts. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).
  • Zaal, M. (2011). The role of regulatory focus preferences among members of stigmatized groups in the adoption of collective action strategies. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Ellemers, N., Scheepers, D., & Popa, A. (2010). Something to gain or something to lose? Affirmative action and regulatory focus emotions. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 13, 201-213.
  • Faddegon, K., Ellemers, N., & Scheepers, D. (2009). Eager to be the best, or vigilant no to be the worst: The emergence of regulatory focus in disjunctive and conjunctive group tasks. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 12, 653-671.
  • Faddegon, K., Scheepers, D., & Ellemers, N. (2008). If we have the will, there will be a way: Regulatory focus as a group identity. European Journal of Social Psychology, 38, 880-895.
  • Zaal, M. P., Van Laar, C., Ståhl, T., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (in press). By any means necessary: The effects of regulatory focus and moral conviction on hostile and benevolent forms of collective action. British Journal of Social Psychology.
  • Zaal, M.P., Van Laar, C., Ståhl, T., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (in press). Social Change as an Important Goal or Likely Outcome: How Regulatory Focus Affects Commitment to Collective Action. British Journal of Social Psychology
  • Zaal, M.P., Van Laar, C., Ståhl, T., Ellemers, N., & Derks, B. (submitted). Responding to Tokenism: How Promotion and Prevention Focus Affect Commitment to Collective and Individual Status Improvement.


Team motivation

Dissertations

  • Barreto, M. (2000). Identity and strategy in pro-group behaviour. (Proefschrift, VU Amsterdam).
  • Ouwerkerk, J. (2000). Comparison-based reactions to group performance outcomes. (Proefschrift, VU Amsterdam).

Publications

  • Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2000). You can’t always do what you want: Social identity and self-presentational determinants of the choice to work for a low status group. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 891-906.
  • Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2002). The impact of anonymity and group identification on pro-group behavior in computer mediated groups. Small Group Research, 33, 590-610.
  • Doosje, B., Spears, R., & Ellemers, N. (2002). Social identity as both cause and effect: The development of group identification in response to anticipated and actual changes in the intergroup status hierarchy. British Journal of Social Psychology, 41, 57-76.
  • Ellemers, N., De Gilder, D., & Van den Heuvel, H. (1998). Career-oriented versus team-oriented commitment and behavior at work. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83, 717-730.
  • Ellemers, N., De Gilder, D., & Haslam, S.A. (2004). Motivating individuals and groups at work: A social identity perspective on leadership and group performance. Academy of Management Review, 29, 459-478.
  • Ellemers, N., Kortekaas, P., & Ouwerkerk, J. (1999). Self-categorization, commitment to the group and social self-esteem as related but distinct aspects of social identity. European Journal of Social Psychology, 29, 371-389.
  • Ellemers, N., Spears, R., & Doosje, B. (1997). Sticking together or falling apart: Group identification as a psychological determinant of group commitment versus individual mobility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72, 123-140.
  • Ouwerkerk, J., & Ellemers, N. (2002). The benefits of being disadvantaged: Performance-related circumstances and consequences of intergroup comparisons. European Journal of Social Psychology, 32, 73-91.
  • Ouwerkerk, J., De Gilder, D., & De Vries, N.K. (2000). When the going gets tough, the tough get going: Social identification and individual effort in intergroup competition. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1550-1559.


Respect and performance

Dissertations:

  • Boezeman, E. (2009). Managing the volunteer organization: Strategies to recruit, content, and retain volunteers. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).
  • Sleebos, E. (2005). Consequences of perceived intra-group respect: The effects of differential intra-group respect on behavior and cognition. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications:

  • Branscombe, N., Spears, R., Ellemers, N., & Doosje, B. (2002). Effects of intragroup and intergroup evaluations on group behavior. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28, 744-753.
  • Boezeman, E., & Ellemers, N. (2007). Volunteering for charity: Pride, respect, and Commitment of volunteer workers. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92, 771-785.
  • Boezeman, E., & Ellemers, N. (2009). Intrinsic need satisfaction and the job attitudes of volunteers versus employees working in a charitable volunteer organization. Journal of Organizational and Occupational Psychology, 82, 897-914.
  • Boezeman, E., & Ellemers, N. (2008). Volunteer recruitment: The role of organizational support and anticipated respect in non-volunteers’ attraction to charitable volunteer organizations. Journal of Applied Psychology, 93 (5), 1013-1026.
  • Boezeman, E., & Ellemers, N. (2008). Pride and respect in volunteers’ organizational commitment. European Journal of Social Psychology, 38, 159-172.
  • Ellemers, N., & Boezeman, E. (2009). Empowering the volunteer organization: What volunteer organizations can do to attract, motivate and retain volunteer workers. In: Stürmer, S., & Snyder, M. (Eds.). Psychology of helping: New directions in intergroup prosocial behavior (pp. 245-266). Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Ellemers, N., Doosje, B., & Spears, R. (2004). Sources of respect: The effects of being liked by ingroups and outgroups. European Journal of Social Psychology, 34, 155-172.
  • Ellemers, N., Sleebos, E., Stam, D., & de Gilder, D. (in press). Feeling included and valued: How perceived respect affects positive team identity and willingness to invest in the team. British Journal of Management.
  • Sleebos, E., Ellemers, N., & De Gilder, D. (2006). The paradox of the disrespected: Disrespected group members’ engagement in group-serving effort. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 42, 413-427.
  • Sleebos, E., Ellemers, N., & De Gilder, D. (2006). The carrot and the stick: Affective commitment and acceptance anxiety as motives for discretionary group efforts by respected and disrespected group members. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 244-255.
  • Sleebos, E., Ellemers, N., & de Gilder, D. (2007). Explaining the motivational forces of (dis)respect: How self-focused and group-focused concerns can result in the display of behavioral group effortsGruppendynamik und Organizationsberatung, 38, 327-342.
  • Spears, R., Ellemers, N., & Doosje, B. (2005). Let me count the ways in which I respect thee: Does competence compensate or compromise lack of liking from the group? European Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 263-280.


Work - Family

Dissertation

  • Van Steenbergen, E. (2007). Work-family facilitation: A positive psychological perspective on role combination (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Van Steenbergen, E. & Ellemers, N. (2009). Privé en werk samen sterk: Een positief psychologisch perspectief op het combineren van rollen. De Psycholoog, 44, 141-147.
  • Van Steenbergen, E., & Ellemers, N. (2009). Is managing the work-family interface worth while? Benefits for employee health and performance. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 30, 617-642.
  • Van Steenbergen, E., Ellemers, N., Haslam, S.A., & Urlings, F. (2008). There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so: Informational support and cognitive appraisal of the work-family interface. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 81, 349-367.
  • Van Steenbergen, E., Ellemers, N., & Mooijaart, A. (2007). How Work and Family can Facilitate Each Other: Distinct Types of Work-Family Facilitation and Outcomes for Women and Men. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 12, 279-300.
  • Van Steenbergen, E., Ellemers, N., & Mooijaart, A. (2009). How family-supportive work environments and work-supportive home environments can reduce work-family conflict and enhance facilitation. In: D.R. Crane & E.J. Hill (Eds.). Families and work: Interdisciplinary perspectives (pp. 79-104). Lanham: University Press of America.


Newcomers and diversity in groups

Dissertation

  • Rink, F. (2005). Diversity and small group decision making. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Ellemers, N., & Rink, F. (2005). Identity in work groups: The beneficial and detrimental consequences of multiple identities and group norms for collaboration and group performance. Advances in Group Processes, 22, 1-41.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2011). From current state to desired future: How compositional changes affect dissent and innovation in work groups. In: J. Jetten & M. J. Hornsey (Eds.) Rebels in groups: Dissent, deviance, difference, and defiance. (pp. 54-72). Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2006). What can you expect? The influence of gender diversity in dyads on work goal expectancies and subsequent work commitment. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 9, 577-588.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2007). The role of expectancies in accepting task-related diversity: Do disappointment and lack of commitment stem from actual differences or violated expectations? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 842-854.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2007). Defining the common feature: Task-related differences as the basis for dyadic identity. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 499-515.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2009). Temporary vs. permanent group membership: How the future prospects of newcomers affect newcomer acceptance and newcomer influence. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35, 764-775.
  • Rink, F., & Ellemers, N. (2010). Benefiting from deep-level diversity: How congruence between knowledge and decision rules improves team decision making and team perceptions. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 13, 345-359.


Subtle discrimination

Dissertations

  • Cihangir, S. (2009). The dark side of subtle discrimination: How targets respond to different forms of discrimination. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).
  • Stroebe, K. (2009). Is this about me? Responding to subtle discrimination – beyond an individual versus group perspective. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2005). The perils of political correctness: Responses of men and women to old-fashioned and modern sexism. Social Psychology Quarterly, 68, 75-88.
  • Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2005). The burden of ‘benevolent’sexism: How it contributes to the maintenance of gender inequalities. European Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 633-642.
  • Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., Piebinga, L., & Moya, M. (2010). How nice of us and how dumb of me: The effect of exposure to benevolent sexism on women’s task and relational self-descriptions. Sex Roles, 62, 532-544.
  • Cihangir, S., Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2010). The dark side of ambiguous discrimination: how state self-esteem moderates emotional and behavioural responses to ambiguous and unambiguous discrimination. British Journal of Social Psychology, 49, 155-174.
  • Ellemers, N., & Barreto, M. (2008). Maintaining the illusion of meritocracy. In: Demoulin, S., Leyens, J.Ph., & Dovidio, J.F. (Eds.). Intergroup misunderstandings: Impact of divergent social realities (pp. 191-212). Psychology Press.
  • Ellemers, N. & Barreto, M. (2009). Collective action in modern times: How modern expressions of prejudice prevent collective action. Journal of Social Issues, 65, 749-768.
  • Garcia, D., Schmitt, M.T., Branscombe, N.R., & Ellemers, N. (2010). Women’s reactions to ingroup members who protest discriminatory treatment: The importance of beliefs about inequality and response appropriateness. European Journal of Social Psychology, 40, 733-745.
  • Stroebe, K., Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2010). When searching hurts: The role of information search in reactions to gender discrimination. Sex Roles, 62, 60-76.
  • Stroebe, K., Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2010). Experiencing discrimination: How members of disadvantaged groups can be helped to cope with discrimination. Social Issues and Policy Review, 4, 181-213.
  • Stroebe, K., Dovidio, J.F., Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., & John, M.S. (2011). Is the world a just place? Countering the negative consequences of pervasive discrimination by affirming the world as just. British Journal of Social Psychology, 50, 484-500.
  • Stroebe, K.E., Ellemers, N., Barreto, M., & Mummendey, A. (2009). For better or for worse: The congruence of personal and group outcomes on targets’ responses to discrimination. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39,576-591.


Queen Bee effects

Publications

  • Derks, B., Ellemers, N., Van Laar, C., & de Groot, K.  (2011). Do sexist organizational cultures create the Queen Bee? British Journal of Social Psychology, 50, 519-535.
  • Derks, B., Van Laar, C., Ellemers, N., & De Groot, K. (2011). Gender bias primes elicit Queen Bee responses among senior police women. Psychological Science, 22, 1243- 1249.
  • Ellemers, N. (1993) Sociale identiteit en sekse: Het dilemma van succesvolle vrouwen. Tijdschrift voor Vrouwenstudies, 14, 322-336.
  • Ellemers, N., & Barreto, M. (2008). Putting your own down: How members of disadvantaged groups perpetuate or exacerbate their disadvantage. In: Brief, A. (Ed.). Diversity at work (pp. 202-261). Cambridge University Press.
  • Ellemers, N., Rink, F., Derks, B., & Ryan, M. (in press). Women in high places: When and why promoting women into top positions can harm them individually or as a group (and how to prevent this). Research in Organizational Behavior.
  • Ellemers, N., Van den Heuvel, H., De Gilder, D., Maass, A., & Bonvini, A. (2004). The underrepresentation of women in science: Differential commitment or the Queen-bee syndrome? British Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 315-338.
  • Schmitt, M.T., Ellemers, N., & Branscombe, N. (2003). Perceiving and responding to gender discrimination at work. In: Haslam, A., Van Knippenberg, D., Platow, M., & Ellemers, N. Social identity at work: Developing theory for organizational practice (pp. 277-292).Psychology Press.


Moral behavior

Dissertations

  • Ståhl, T. (2009). Determinants of fairness- based versus favorability-based reactions to authorities’ decisions.  (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).
  • Terwel, B. (2009). Origins and consequences of public trust: Toward an understanding of public acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Does, S., Derks, B., & Ellemers, N. (2011). Thou shall not discriminate: How emphasizing moral ideals rather than obligations increases whites' support for social equality. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 562-571.
  • Ellemers, N., & Van den Bos, K. (in press). On the social regulatory functions of right and wrong. Personality Psychology Compass.
  • Ellemers, N. & Boezeman, E. Integrity and compliance: How perceived organizational morality and competence of a financial service organization relate to employee compliance and work satisfaction. Manuscript ter publicatie aangeboden.
  • Ellemers, N., Pagliaro, S., & Barreto, M. (in press). Morality and behavioral regulation in groups: A social identity approach. European Review of Social Psychology. 
  • Ellemers, N., Kingma, L., Van de Burgt, J., & Barreto, M. (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as a source of organizational morality, employee commitment and satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Moral Psychology, 1, 97-124.
  • Ellemers, N., Pagliaro, S., Barreto, M., & Leach, C.W. (2008). Is it better to be moral than smart? The effects of morality and competence norms on the decision to work at group status improvement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95 (6), 1397-1410.
  • Kouzakova, M., Ellemers, N., Harinck, F., & Scheepers, D. (in press). The implications of value conflict: How disagreement on values affects self-involvement and perceived common ground. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
  • Leach, C., Ellemers, N., & Barreto, M. (2007). Group virtue: The importance of morality vs. competence and sociability in the evaluation of in-groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93, 234-249.
  • Pagliaro, S., Ellemers, N, & Barreto, M., (2011). Sharing moral values: Anticipated ingroup respect as a determinant of adherence to morality-based (but not competence-based) group norms. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 37, 1117-1129.
  • Stahl, T., Vermunt, R., & Ellemers, N. (2008). Reactions to outgroup authorities’ decisions: The role of expected bias, procedural fairness and outcome favorability. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 11, 281-299.
  • Ståhl, T., Vermunt, R., & Ellemers, N. (2008). For love or money? How activation of relational versus instrumental concerns affects reactions to allocations by authorities. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 80-94.
  • Terwel, B., Harinck, F., Ellemers, N., & Daamen, D.L. (2009). Competence-based and integrity-based trust as predictors of acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage technology (CCS). Risk Analysis: An International Journal, 29, 1129-1140.
  • Terwel, B., Harinck, F., Ellemers, N., & Daamen, D.L. (2009). How organizational motives and communications affect public trust in organizations: The case of carbon dioxide capture and storage. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 29, 290-299.
  • Terwel, B., Harinck, F., Ellemers, N., & Daamen, D. (2011). Going beyond the properties of CO2 capture and storage (CCS): How trust in stakeholders affects public acceptance of CCS. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 181-188. 
  • Van Nunspeet, F., Ellemers, N., Derks, B., & Nieuwenhuis, S. (2012). Moral concerns increase attention and response monitoring during IAT performance: ERP evidence. Manuscript ter publicatie aangeboden.


Multiple identities

Dissertations

  • Bleeker, D. (2010). Representing or defecting? The pursuit of individual upward mobility in low status groups. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).
  • Derks, B. (2007). Social identity threat and performance motivation. (Proefschrift, Universiteit Leiden).

Publications

  • Barreto, M., & Ellemers, N. (2002). The impact of respect vs. neglect of self-identities on identification and group loyalty. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 28, 493-503.
  • Barreto, M., Spears, R., Ellemers, N., & Shahinper, K. (2003). Who wants to know? The effect of audience on identity expression among minority group members. British Journal of Social Psychology, 42, 299-318.
  • Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., Scholten, W., & Smith, H. (2010). To be or not to be: The impact of implicit versus explicit inappropriate social categorizations on the self. British Journal of Social Psychology, 49, 43-67.
  • Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., & Banal, S. (2006). Working under cover: Performance-related self-confidence among members of contextually devalued groups who try to pass. European Journal of Social Psychology, 36, 337-352. 
  • Derks, B., Van Laar, C., & Ellemers, N. (2009). Working for the self or working for the group: How self- vs. group-affirmation affect collective behavior in low status groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96, 183-202.
  • Derks, B., Scheepers, D., Van Laar, C., & Ellemers, N. (2011). The threat vs. challenge of car parking for women: How self- and group affirmation affect cardiovascular responses.Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 178-183.
  • Derks, B., Van Laar, C., & Ellemers, N. (2006). Striving for success in outgroup settings: Effects of contextually emphasizing ingroup dimensions on stigmatized group members’ social identity and performance styles. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 576-588.
  • Derks, B., Van Laar, C., & Ellemers, N. (2007). Social creativity strikes back: Improving low status group members’ motivation and performance by valuing ingroup dimensions. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 470-493.
  • Ellemers, N., & Barreto, M. (2006). Categorization in everyday life: The effects of positive and negative categorization on emotions and self-views. European Journal of Social Psychology, 36, 931-942.
  • Ellemers, N. & Barreto, M. (2006). Social identity and self-presentation at work: How attempts to hide a stigmatized identity affect emotional well-being, social inclusion and performance. Netherlands Journal of Psychology, 62, 51-57.
  • Van Laar, C., Derks, B., & Ellemers, N. (2010). Gevolgen van stigma. In: Rodrigues, P.R. & Van Donselaar, J. (Red.) Monitor Racisme en Extremisme, Negende Rapportage (181-202). Anne Frank Stichting/Amsterdam University Press.
  • Van Laar, C., Derks, B., Ellemers, N., & Bleeker, D. (2010). Valuing social identity: Consequences for motivation and performance in low status groups. Journal of Social Issues, 66, 602-617.


Power differences

Publications

  • Barreto, M., Ellemers, N., & Fiske, S.T. (2010). “What did you say, and who do you think you are?” How Power Differences Affect Emotional Reactions to Prejudice. Journal of Social Issues, 66, 477-492.
  • Bruins, J., Ellemers, N., & De Gilder, D. (1999). Power use and differential competence as determinant of subordinates’evaluation and behavioural responses in simulated organizations.  European Journal of Social Psychology, 29, 843-870.
  • De Gilder, D., Ellemers, N., & Bruins, J. (1997) Is er samenwerking na machtsgebruik? Gedrag en Organisatie, 10, 400-411.
  • Ellemers, N., Van Rijswijk, W., Bruins, J., & De Gilder, D. (1998). Group commitment as a moderator of attributional and behavioural responses to power use. European Journal of Social Psychology, 28, 555-573.
  • Sassenberg, K., Ellemers, N, & Scheepers, D. (in press). The attraction of social power: The influence of construing power as opportunity versus responsibility. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
  • Scheepers, D., Ellemers, N., & Sassenberg, K. (in press). The power of accountability: How power differences within groups and status differences between groups affect promotion and prevention choices in decision making. British Journal of Social Psychology.
  • Scheepers, D., De Wit, F., Ellemers, N., & Sassenberg, K. (in press). Social power makes the heart work more efficiently: Evidence from cardiovascular markers of challenge and threat. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.